Parsons-UXB Joint Venture on Kaho’olawe Island Reserve Demilitarization GIS

Parsons-UXB Joint Venture on Kaho’olawe Island Reserve Demilitarization GIS

Challenge

The 11×7-mile Hawaiian island of Kaho’olawe lies six miles off the west coast of Maui. The Navy used it from 1945 until 1990 for air- and sea-based target practice, leaving a trail of unexploded ordnance (UXO), from small arms munitions to 500lb World War II-era bombs and 1,500lb nuclear simulators.  Parsons-UXB developed an island-wide GIS to manage the clean up of unexploded ordnance (UXO). The GIS tracks the location, disposition and handling of every suspected unexploded ordnance item uncovered on the island, plus the location of any historically significant sites, natural resources or environmental hazards. The goals of the new project were to:

  • Improve the performance of the existing GIS database schema
  • Migrate from a legacy MGE system to an enterprise spatial database
  • Develop a website capable of integrating GIS features and data from multiple databases
  • Implement an intranet website that would equip stakeholders within the US Navy, the State of Hawaii, and the project team with an intuitive interface to GIS and tabular data.

Solution

Farallon delivered a web solution that presents up-to-the-minute GIS and tabular data, without translation or reformatting of project data, from data warehouses that are being updated on a daily basis.  Farallon designed, delivered, installed, tested, and tuned the web solution on budget and on time, despite an extremely aggressive contract schedule of less than six weeks from contract signing to delivery.  Kaho’olawe was divided into a grid containing 10×10 meter units.  Using a web interface, users who click on a grid square get a summary of information at a glance, while those who click on a piece of UXO get information and photographs about that item. The database includes more than 89,000 pieces of UXO with attributed GPS coordinates and images depicting everything from vegetation to the destruction date of ordnance in a particular grid square.

Subsequently, Parsons hired Farallon to install, configure and migrate Parsons-UXB’s spatial data and spatial data management workflows into an Oracle Spatial database.

  • Configuration/implementation of Oracle Spatial
  • Business process analysis, definition and redesign
  • Oracle PL/SQL database programming
  • Application integration
  • Migration from MGE
  • Data reconciliation and conversion
  • Post implementation support
  • Development of a website capable of integrating GIS features and data from multiple databases
  • Implementationan intranet website that presents stakeholders within the US Navy, the State of Hawaii, and the project team with an intuitive interface to GIS and tabular data.

Screenshots & Videos

Color-coded weekly progress maps helped all interested parties to stay apprised of project status.

Color-coded weekly progress maps helped all interested parties to stay apprised of project status.

Before any UXO was detonated in place, project managers created a 100-meter zone around the item (the fragmentation distance of the anticipated explosion) to determine if any archaeological sites or threatened or endangered species were at risk.

Before any UXO was detonated in place, project managers created a 100-meter zone around the item (the fragmentation distance of the anticipated explosion) to determine if any archaeological sites or threatened or endangered species were at risk.

This UXO hazard map was produced from counts of items found on the island. A weighting factor was applied to each UXO type and a score produced for each grid -- with each grid then colored based on its score. Higher scores indicated by darker (hotter) colors contain the greatest hazard. This type of map helped to determine the most appropriate areas for subsurface detection.

This UXO hazard map was produced from counts of items found on the island. A weighting factor was applied to each UXO type and a score produced for each grid — with each grid then colored based on its score. Higher scores indicated by darker (hotter) colors contain the greatest hazard. This type of map helped to determine the most appropriate areas for subsurface detection.